812 – I Think We’re Alone Now (2018)

I Think We’re Alone Now is a 2018 American science fiction drama film, directed by Reed Morano and written by Mike Makowsky. It stars Peter Dinklage and Elle Fanning as two survivors of a worldwide epidemic that wipes out earth’s population. (wiki)MV5BMGZlOTEwNzgtM2U2OC00ZGI4LThjMGYtMzA4YTZmNzc4Njk5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTMxODk2OTU@._V1_imdb

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809 – Ambient 4: On Land (1982)

Ambient 4: On Land is the eighth solo studio album by British ambient musician Brian Eno. It was the final edition in Eno’s ambient series, which began in 1978 with Music for Airports.


On Land is a mixture of synthesizer-based notes, nature/animal recordings, and a complex array of other sounds, most of which were unused, collected recordings from previous albums and the sessions that created them. As Eno explained, “… the making of records such as On Land involved feeding unheard tape into the mix, constant feeding and remixing, subtracting and “composting”. (…) “instrumentation shifted gradually through electro-mechanical and acoustic instruments towards non-instruments like pieces of chain and sticks and stones … I included not only recordings of rooks, frogs and insects, but also the complete body of my own earlier work”.

Despite the music’s dark leanings, it is in a sense still highly “ambient” in that the tracks tend to blend into each other and thus fulfill all of Eno’s original expectations of what the term means. Nevertheless, there is still room for the occasional surprise, such as Jon Hassell‘s recognisable effect-laden trumpet in “Shadow“. Eno, cognizant of the deeper aural qualities, said, “On the whole, On Land is quite a disturbed landscape: some of the undertones deliberately threaten the overtones, so you get the pastoral prettiness on top, but underneath there’s a dissonance that’s like an impending earthquake”.

The album makes reference to definite geographical places, such as “Lizard Point“, named after the exposed, southernmost tip of mainland Britain, close to Land’s End in South-West England.

Tal Coat” refers to Pierre Louis Jacob (1905–1985), aka Pierre Tal-Coat, a proponent of the French form of abstract expressionismTachisme. This interest in painting is reflected in his statement that the album was “… an attempt to transpose into music something that you can do in painting: creating a figurative environment. At the beginning of the 20th century, the ambition of the great painters was to make paintings that were like music, which was then considered as the noblest art because it was abstract, not figurative. In contrast, my intention in On Land was to make music that was like figurative painting, but without referring to the history of music – more to a “history of listening””

Lantern Marsh” was a place in East Anglia where he grew up. He remarks, “My experience of it derives not from having visited it (although I almost certainly did) but from having subsequently seen it on a map and imagining where and what it might be”.

Leeks Hills“, Eno explains, “is a little wood (much smaller now than when I was young, and this not merely the effect of age and memory) which stands between Woodbridge and Melton. There isn’t a whole lot left of it now, but it used to be quite extensive. To find it you travel down the main road connecting Woodbridge and it lies to your left as you go down the hill”.

Dunwich Beach, Autumn, 1960” is named after the once prosperous seaport of Dunwich, England, which eroded into the sea over a period of three hundred years. (wiki <3)

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802 – The Adjustment Bureau (2011)

timespace coordinates: 2006 – 2010 New York Cityadjustment posterThe Adjustment Bureau is a 2011 American romantic science fiction thriller film loosely based on the Philip K. Dick short story “Adjustment Team“. The film was written and directed by George Nolfi, produced by Chris Moore and stars Matt Damon and Emily Blunt. The cast also includes Anthony MackieJohn SlatteryMichael Kelly, and Terence Stamp. The film tells the story of a United States congressman who discovers that what appear to be chance events in his life are controlled by a technologically advanced intelligence network. (wiki)

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778 – Discworld (1995 video game)

discworldDiscworld is a 1995 point-and-click adventure game developed by Teeny Weeny Games and Perfect 10 Productions for MS-DOS, Macintosh, and the Sony PlayStation. A Sega Saturn version was released the following year. The game stars Rincewind the Wizard (voiced by Eric Idle) and is set on Terry Pratchett‘s Discworld. The plot is based roughly around the events in the book Guards! Guards!, but also borrows elements from other Discworld novels. It involves Rincewind attempting to stop a dragon terrorising the inhabitants of Ankh-Morpork.

The game was developed because the designer Gregg Barnett wanted a large adventure for CD-based systems. A licence was difficult to obtain; Pratchett was reluctant to grant one as he wanted a Discworld game to be developed by a company with a reputation and who cared about the property. An original story was created due to Barnett having difficulty basing games on one book. Discworld was praised for its humour, voice-acting and graphics, though some criticised its gameplay and difficult puzzles. Discworld was followed by a sequel, Discworld II: Missing Presumed…!?, in 1996. (wiki)

Ankh-Morpork

Ankh-Morpork lies on the River Ankh (the most polluted waterway on the Discworld and reputedly solid enough to walk on), where the fertile loam of the Sto Plains (similar to Western Europe) meets the Circle Sea (the Discworld’s version of the Mediterranean). This, naturally, puts it in an excellent trading position. Lying approximately equidistant from the cold Hub and tropical Rim, Ankh-Morpork is in the Discworld’s equivalent of the temperate zone. The name “Ankh-Morpork” refers to both the city itself, a walled city about five miles (8 km) across, and the surrounding suburbs and farms of its fiefdom. The central city divides more or less into the more affluent Ankh and the poorer Morpork which includes the slum-like “Shades”, which are separated by the River Ankh. Ankh-Morpork is built on black loam, broadly, but is mostly built on itself; pragmatic citizens simply built on top of the existing buildings when the sediment grew too high as the river flooded, rather than excavate them out. There are many unknown basements, including an entire “cave network” below Ankh-Morpork made up of old streets and abandoned sewers (it has been continuously stated that anyone with a pickaxe and a good sense of direction could reach anywhere in Ankh-Morpork by knocking walls down in a straight line, though in Thud! it is added that they would also need to breathe mud). Recently, the underground regions have been extended by the city’s dwarf population to get around unimpeded. It has recently been made municipal property. Ankh-Morpork is also the city with the most dwarfs on the whole disc outside of Überwald, largely considered the dwarfen homeland, with over 50,000 dwarfs living there.  (wiki)


Terry Pratchett – Back in Black BBC Documentary 2017 (youtube)

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678 – Blood Tea and Red String (2006)

Blood-Tea-and-Red-String-images-ba7f9c28-c47c-48d9-a08c-a12ecdd0da0

MV5BM2UxOTA4NGQtZmI1MS00YTY4LTkxMGYtOTRjZTFjY2JmODI1XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNDUxNjc5NjY@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1441,1000_AL_Blood Tea and Red String is a stop-motion-animated feature film, directed by Christiane Cegavske. It was released on February 2, 2006 after a production time of 13 years, having been filmed in various places in the West Coast and in two studios. The musical score was composed and performed by Mark Growden. Cegavske says in the audio commentary to the DVD for this film that it is to be the first in a trilogy.

“A handmade stop-motion fairy tale for adults that tells the tale of the struggle between the aristocratic White Mice and the rustic Oak Dwellers over the doll of their heart’s desire.” imdb

677 – My Winnipeg (2007)

timespace coordinates: 20th century SnowySleep-Walking Winnipeg

ced03fd35cbf94208cb107f22c0508f4My Winnipeg is a 2007 film directed and written by Guy Maddin with dialogue by George Toles. Described by Maddin as a “docu-fantasia,” that melds “personal history, civic tragedy, and mystical hypothesizing,” the film is a surrealist mockumentary about Winnipeg, Maddin’s home town. A New York Times article described the film’s unconventional take on the documentary style by noting that it “skates along an icy edge between dreams and lucidity, fact and fiction, cinema and psychotherapy.”

Maddin also released a book titled My Winnipeg (Coach House Books, 2009). Maddin’s book contains the film’s narration as a main text surrounded by annotations, including outtakes, marginal notes and digressions, production stills, family photos, and miscellaneous material. The book contains a “Winnipeg Map” by artist Marcel Dzama featuring such fictional attractions as “The Giant Squid of the Red [River],” various poster designs for the film, and short articles about working with Maddin by Andy Smetanka, Darcy Fehr, and Caelum Vatnsdal. Maddin also includes an angry e-mail from an ex-girlfriend, collages and notebooks pages, and an X-ray of the dog Spanky from the film. The book also includes an interview with Maddin’s mother Herdis, conducted by Ann Savage, and an interview with Maddin conducted by Michael Ondaatje. Maddin’s publisher offers the book with or without a DVD of the film, distributed by Seville Pictures.

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