1225 – Daybreakers (2009)

timespace coordinates: 2019 USkinopoisk.ruDaybreakers is a 2009 Australian–American “Ozploitation” science fiction action horror film written and directed by Michael and Peter Spierig. The film takes place in a futuristic world overrun by vampires. A vampiric corporation sets out to capture and farm the remaining humans while researching a substitute for human blood. Lead vampire hematologist Edward Dalton’s (Ethan Hawke) work is interrupted by human survivors led by former vampire “Elvis” (Willem Dafoe), who has a cure that can save the human species. (wiki)

imdb

1220 – Terminus (2015)

MV5BMTUyMjA5OTgyOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwOTkyMjQ5NTE@._V1_Terminus is a 2015 Australian science fiction drama film directed by Marc Furmie, who wrote it with Shiyan Zheng and Gabriel Dowrick. It stars Jai KoutraeTodd LasanceBren Foster, and Kendra Appleton. Terminus tells the story of David, a small town American who has a near fatal accident after coming in contact with a meteorite. The mysterious object has an extraterrestrial element with enormous implications for humankind.

The film was made on a small budget in Sydney with a predominantly Australian cast. It has been praised for its character introspection and classic sci-fi feel. (wiki)

imdb   /   abiogenesis

1212 – Where the Wild Things Are (2009)

MV5BNzQ1NzAwODEwM15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNTE4MjI4Mg@@._V1_Where the Wild Things Are is a 2009 “self-consciously sad” fantasy drama film directed by Spike Jonze. Written by Jonze and Dave Eggers, it is adapted from Maurice Sendak‘s 1963 children’s book of the same name. It combines live-action, performers in costumesanimatronics, and computer-generated imagery (CGI).

The film stars Max Records and features the voices of James GandolfiniPaul DanoLauren AmbroseForest WhitakerCatherine O’Hara, and Chris Cooper. The film centers on a lonely boy named Max who sails away to an island inhabited by creatures known as the “Wild Things,” who declare Max their king.

imdb

1188

pandora’s-promise

www.lightpollutionmap.info/


Today, man has a physical body, an etheric body, an astral body, and an ego. When the ego works upon the astral body, ennobling it intellectually, morally, and spiritually, then the astral body becomes the spirit self or manas. That has as of now hardly begun, but when in the future it will have been completed, when man will have transformed his whole astral body, then will his astral body become physically luminous. Just as the seed holds the whole plant within it, so does your astral body hold within it the seed of light. This will stream out into the world of space, its development and continuing formation effected by man as he ever more purifies and ennobles his astral body. Our earth will transform itself into other planets. Today it is dark. Were one to observe it from space, then one would see that it appears bright only through the reflected light of the sun. Someday, however, it will be luminous, luminous through the fact that human beings will then have transformed their whole astral bodies. The totality of astral bodies will stream out as light into world space, as it was also at the time of the old Sun. It had higher beings at their human stage, and these beings had luminous astral bodies. The Bible, quite correctly, calls these beings, Spirits of Light or Elohim.

https://wn.rsarchive.org/Lectures/GA101/English/AP1972/19070913p01.html


 

1146 – Baraka (1992)

Baraka is a 1992 non-narrative documentary film directed by Ron Fricke. The film is often compared to Koyaanisqatsi, the first of the Qatsi films by Godfrey Reggio for which Fricke served as the cinematographer. It is also the most recent film to be photographed in the 70mm Todd-AO format, and the first film ever to be restored and scanned at 8K resolution. (wiki)

Named after a Sufi word that translates roughly as “breath of life” or “blessing,” Baraka is Ron Fricke‘s impressive follow-up to Godfrey Reggio‘s non-verbal documentary film Koyaanisqatsi. Fricke was cinematographer and collaborator on Reggio’s film, and for Baraka he struck out on his own to polish and expand the photographic techniques used on Koyaanisqatsi. The result is a tour-de-force in 70mm: a cinematic “guided meditation” (Fricke’s own description) shot in 24 countries on six continents over a 14-month period that unites religious ritual, the phenomena of nature, and man’s own destructive powers into a web of moving images. Fricke’s camera ranges, in meditative slow motion or bewildering time-lapse, over the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, the Ryoan-Ji temple in Kyoto, Lake Natron in Tanzania, burning oil fields in Kuwait, the smoldering precipice of an active volcano, a busy subway terminal, tribal celebrations of the Maasai in Kenya, chanting monks in the Dip Tse Chok Ling monastery…and on and on, through locales across the globe. To execute the film’s time-lapse sequences, Fricke had a special camera built that combined time-lapse photography with perfectly controlled movements of the camera. In one evening sequence a desert sky turns black, and the stars roll by, as the camera moves slowly forward under the trees. The feeling is like that of viewing the universe through a powerful telescope: that we are indeed on a tiny orb hurtling through a star-filled void. The film is complemented by the hybrid world-music of Michael Stearns. ~ Anthony Reed, Rovi (rottentomatoes)

imdb   /   on YouTube