657 – Mind Game (2004)

GKIDS-MG-poster-webMind Game (マインド・ゲーム) is a 2004 Japanese animated feature film based on Robin Nishi’s manga of the same name. It was planned, produced and primarily animated by Studio 4°C and adapted and directed by Masaaki Yuasa in his directorial debut, with chief animation direction and model sheets by Yūichirō Sueyoshi, art direction by Tōru Hishiyama and groundwork and further animation direction by Masahiko Kubo.

It is unusual among features other than anthology films in using a series of disparate visual styles to tell one continuous story. As Yuasa commented in a Japan Times interview, “Instead of telling it serious and straight, I went for a look that was a bit wild and patchy. I think that Japanese animation fans today don’t necessarily demand something that’s so polished. You can throw different styles at them and they can still usually enjoy it.”1514453512766The film received a cult audience and was well received, winning multiple awards worldwide, and has been praised by directors Satoshi Kon and Bill Plympton. Allegedly, according to Tekkonkinkreet director Michael Arias, there was consideration for a release of the film on R1 DVD but it fell through. The film is now available to stream on Netflix in Australia as of 2016. GKIDS announced that they licensed the film, which will be streamed on VRV Select on December 29, 2017 followed by a limited theatrical run in February 2018 and a home video release in spring 2018. (wiki)

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656

655 – The 12th Man / Den 12. mann (2017)

spacetime coordinates: 1943  Norway > Sweden, via Lyngenhalvøya and Manndalen

MV5BYzI1MzA0NjUtNWI2MC00NDg0LThiYmItN2RjZWRmN2E0MmVmXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyODY3Nzc0OTk@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,675,1000_AL_The 12th Man is a 2017 Norwegian historical drama directed by Harald Zwart and written by Petter Skavlan. The main role of Jan Baalsrud is played by Thomas Gullestad, who escapes from Germans in Rebbenesøya, via Lyngen Fjord and Manndalen, to neutral Sweden in the spring of 1943.

The film is based on the same historical events and has the same protagonist as the Arne Skouen Oscar-nominated film Nine Lives, in which Baalrud’s courage and stamina were also emphasized. The 12th Man is also based on the book Jan Baalsrud and Those Who Saved Him, written by Tore Haug and Astrid Karlsen Scott. Unlike the book, the film puts much emphasis on the efforts of those who helped Baalsrud escape, which was in line with Baalsrud’s own statements about the local population’s courage. The 12th Man’s plot also details the pursuit of Baalsrud from the Gestapo leadership’s perspective, with the escape being depicted as cat-and-mouse game between Sturmbannführer Kurt Stage and Baalsrud. According to German documents, the Nazis believed that the entire Resistance had perished in a blast, meaning that there are no reports indicating that the Germans even knew to hunt for Baalsrud. Baalsrud himself, however, claims that he killed two German soldiers in the fight, which would have definitely created a sharp German response. (wiki)

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653 – Of Gods and Men / Des hommes et des dieux (2010)

spacetime coordinates: 1996, Algeria, Abbey of Our Lady of Atlas

“I have said, Ye are gods; and all of you are children of the most High. But ye shall die like men, and fall like one of the princes.”

4c35e6a0d5454Of Gods and Men is a 2010 French drama film directed by Xavier Beauvois, starring Lambert Wilson and Michael Lonsdale. Its original French language title is Des hommes et des dieux, which means “Of Men and of Gods” and refers to a verse from the Bible shown at the beginning of the film. It centers on the monastery of Tibhirine, where nine Trappist monks lived in harmony with the largely Muslim population of Algeria, until seven of them were kidnapped and assassinated in 1996 during the Algerian Civil War.Of-Gods-and-Men-2010-movie-posterLargely a tale of a peaceful situation between local Christians and Muslims before becoming a lethal one due to external forces, the screenplay focuses on the preceding chain of events in decay of government, expansion of terrorism, and the monks’ confrontation with both the terrorists and the government authorities that led up to their deaths. Principal photography took place at an abandoned monastery in Azrou, Morocco. (wiki)

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652 – Into Great Silence / Die große Stille (2005)

spacetime coordinates: 2002 – 2003,  Grande Chartreuse, Chartreuse Mountains59aa7642179a5b0020372311Into Great Silence (German: Die große Stille) is a documentary film directed by Philip Gröning that was released in 2005. It is an intimate portrayal of the everyday lives of Carthusian monks of the Grande Chartreuse, a monastery high in the French Alps.

The idea for the film was proposed to the monks in 1984, but the Carthusians said they wanted time to think about it. They responded to Gröning 16 years later to say they were willing to permit him to shoot the movie if he was still interested. Gröning then came alone to live at the monastery, where no visitors were ordinarily allowed, for a total of six months. He filmed and recorded on his own, using no artificial light. Gröning then spent two and a half years editing the film. The final cut contains neither spoken commentary nor added sound effects. It consists of images and sounds that depict the rhythm of monastic life, with occasional intertitles displaying selections from Holy Scripture. (wiki)

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651 – Manifesto (2015)

Manifesto is a 2015 Australian-German multi-screen film installation written, produced and directed by Julian Rosefeldt. It features Cate Blanchett in 13 different roles performing various manifestos. A 90-minute feature version premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2017.028The film integrates various types of artist manifestos from different time periods with contemporary scenarios.

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Manifestos: 
Karl Marx / Friedrich Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party (1848)
Philippe Soupault, Literature and the Rest (1920)

Situationism
Lucio Fontana, White Manifesto (1946)
John Reed Club of New York, Draft Manifesto (1932)
Constant Nieuwenhuys, Manifesto (1948)
Alexander Rodchenko, Manifesto of Suprematists and Non-Objective Painters (1919)
Guy Debord, Situationist Manifesto (1960)

Futurism
Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, The Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism (1909)
Giacomo Balla / Umberto Boccioni / Carlo Carrà / Luigi Russolo / Gino Severini, Manifesto of the Futurist Painters (1910)
Guillaume Apollinaire, The Futurist Antitradition (1913)
Dziga Vertov, WE: Variant of a Manifesto (1922)

Architecture
Bruno Taut, Down with Seriousism! (1920)
Bruno Taut, Daybreak (1921)
Antonio Sant’Elia, Manifesto of Futurist Architecture (1914)
Coop Himmelb(l)au, Architecture Must Blaze (1980)
Robert Venturi, Non-Straightforward Architecture: A Gentle Manifesto (1966)

Vorticism / Blue Rider / Abstract Expressionism
Wassily Kandinsky / Franz Marc, “Preface to the Blue Rider Almanac” (1912)
Barnett Newman, The Sublime is Now (1948)
Wyndham Lewis, Manifesto (1914)

Stridentism / Creationism
Manuel Maples Arce, A Strident Prescription (1921)
Vicente Huidobro, We Must Create (1922)
Naum Gabo / Antoine Pevsner, The Realist Manifesto (1920)

Suprematism / Constructivism
Kazimir Malevich, Suprematist Manifesto (1916)
Olga Rozanova, Cubism, Futurism, Suprematism (1917)

Dadaism
Tristan Tzara, Dada Manifesto 1918 (1918)
Tristan Tzara, Manifesto of Monsieur Aa the Antiphilosopher (1920)
Francis Picabia, Dada Cannibalistic Manifesto (1920)
Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, The Pleasures of Dada (1920)
Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, To the Public (1920)
Paul Éluard, Five Ways to Dada Shortage or two Words of Explanation (1920)
Louis Aragon, Dada Manifesto (1920)
Richard Huelsenbeck, First German Dada Manifesto (1918)

Surrealism / Spatialism
André Breton, Manifesto of Surrealism (1924)

Pop Art
Claes Oldenburg, I am for an Art… (1961)

FluxusMerz 
Yvonne Rainer, No Manifesto (1965)
Emmett Williams, Philip Corner, John Cage, Dick Higgins, Allen Bukoff, Larry Miller, Eric Andersen, Tomas Schmit, Ben Vautier, George Maciunas, Fluxus Manifesto (1963)
Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Maintenance Art Manifesto (1969)
Kurt Schwitters, The Merz Stage (1919)

Conceptual Art / Minimalism
Sol LeWitt, Paragraphs on Conceptual Art (1967)
Sol LeWitt, Sentences on Conceptual Art (1969)
Sturtevant, Shifting Mental Structures (1999)
Sturtevant, Man is Double Man is Copy Man is Clone (2004)
Adrian Piper, Idea, Form, Context (1969)

Film
Stan Brakhage, Metaphors on Vision (1963)
Jim Jarmusch, Golden Rules of Filmmaking (2002)
Lars von Trier / Thomas Vinterberg, Dogme 95 (1995)
Werner Herzog, Minnesota Declaration (1999)
Lebbeus Woods, Manifesto (1993)